27 Nov 2017

The Importance Of Hamstring Strength To Protect The ACL

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), being the most important stabiliser of the knee, connects the femur (thigh bone) to the tibia (shin bone). It runs at an oblique angle from the back of the femur to the front of the tibia and its primary role is to prevent anterior translation of the tibia or posterior […]

29 May 2017

ACL Repair And Rugby

A common injury across all sporting formats, including rugby, is an ACL injury. But what happens from a physio point of view? What is the Physiotherapists role in all of this? For those not in the know, the ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) is one of four important stabilising ligaments of the knee. The ACL sits […]

31 Jul 2015

Skiing or Snowboard? Which is safer? 

So with this brutal “Arctic Vortex” that has all of Sydney talking and everywhere outside of Australia chuckling in the same way we do when we hear  there is a “heatwave” of 30 degrees somewhere else in the world, my inability to get warm has naturally drawn my focus towards the winter season ahead and […]

10 May 2015

Anterior Cruciate Ligament – Structure and Injury

The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is one of the key structures in the knee joint. This band-like structure of dense connective tissues originates from the back of the lower aspect of the femur (thigh bone) and inserts onto the front, upper aspect of the tibia (shin bone). Hence, the ACL helps prevent forward movement of […]

6 Dec 2011

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Ruptures In Women

Why are ACL ruptures so common? What can we do about it? A ruptured ACL is a common sporting injury. The incidence is rising and it affects many more females than males. A ruptured ACL will mean 6-12 months out of the game and if not operated on, can lead to early joint degeneration and […]